Overview

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  • Studies to date suggest that there is no association between coffee consumption and the risk of dyspepsia, gastro oesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcers, gastritis or stomach cancer. Evidence suggests that coffee does not worsen symptoms in those who suffer these conditions.
  • Research indicates that coffee consumption does not increase the risk of duodenal ulcers and has no effect on fluid balance in the small intestine.
  • Evidence suggests that there is no association between coffee consumption and disorders of the large intestine, such as diarrhoea and colorectal cancer. Additionally, research has found no association between coffee consumption and intestinal conditions such as diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s Disease.
  • Research suggests that coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of gallbladder disease and liver cancer, and may help limit liver disease progression.
  • Available evidence suggests that coffee consumption is not linked to higher risk of pancreatic cancer, and that there may be a modest, favourable effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer.

The content in this Topic Overview was last edited in July 2016. Papers in the Latest Research section and further resources are added regularly.

This information is intended for Healthcare professional audiences.
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