Alzheimer Europe post-conference materials

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Recent scientific evidence has consistently linked regular, moderate coffee consumption with a possible reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease2,3. An overview of this research and key findings were presented during a satellite symposium at the 2014 Alzhemier Europe Annual Congress.

The satellite symposium “Nutrition and cognitive function” took place on Wednesday, 22 October at 13:00 and formed the foundation of ISIC’s sponsorship.  Chaired by Dr. Iva Holmerova, vice president of Alzheimer Europe, three expert speakers explored the role nutrition can play in the risk reduction of Alzheimer’s Disease, with a particular focus on coffee consumption.

Speakers and topics included:

  • Professor Neville Vassallo, a senior lecturer at University of Malta, who explored the role nutrition can play in reducing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. To view his interview click here, and to view his presentation click here.
  • Professor Arfan Ikram, a professor of epidemiology at Erasmus MC, The Netherlands, who reviewed the epidemiological evidence for the relationship between coffee consumption and Alzheimer’s Disease. Professor Ikram is leading a four year research project, funded by ISIC, exploring the role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of dementia development. To view his interview click here, and to view his presentation click here.
  • Professor Astrid Nehlig, a research director from the French National Medical Research Institute (INSERM), explained the potential underlying mechanisms that govern the relationship between coffee consumption and cognitive decline. To view her interview click here, and to view her presentation click here.

The session report from this symposium highlights the role nutrition can play in preserving cognitive function, especially during the preclinical phase of Alzhemier’s, before symptoms of dementia occur4. To read the full report, click here.

 

References

  1. Alzheimer Europe (2010). The impact of Alzheimer’s disease in Europe. Available at http://www.alzheimer-europe.org/EN/Research/PharmaCog/Why-Pharmacog/(language)/eng-GB
  2. Barranco Quintana J.L. et al. (2007) Alzheimer’s disease and coffee: a quantitative review. Neurol Res, 29:91-5
  3. Santos C. et al. (2010) Caffeine intake and dementia: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Alzheimers Dis, 20(1):187-204.
  4. Lansbury & Lashuel. (2006) Review Article: A century-old debate on protein aggregation and neurodegeneration enters the clinic. Nature, 443:774-779

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